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Then, Muslims should feel hayâ (bashful) towards Allâhu ta’âlâ. Hayâ is from îmân. The bashfulness peculiar to a Muslim is indispensably necessary. It is a must to abhor disbelievers and disbelief and everything outside of Islam and to believe that they are wrong, no matter what theory or ideology they are. Allâhu ta’âlâ has commanded us to take jizya from disbelievers; that is, they must pay taxes. The purpose of this is to humble them. This type of insulting is so effective that they cannot wear valuable suits, nor can they adorn themselves out of the fear of having to pay more jizya. They lead a despicable and miserable life. The purpose of jizya is to abhor and disgrace disbelievers. The jizya shows the glory and honor of Islam. If a dhimmî converts to Islam, he will no longer have to pay jizya. The symptom of îmân’s existence in a heart is its disliking disbelievers. [Disliking is done by the heart. We should live in harmony with disbelievers or any others; we should not cause harm to anybody.][1]

[Temporary co-operation with disbelievers can be formed only politically and when necessity requires it. Yet this shouldn’t go as far as to be integrated with them, and it should end when the necessity is over.

Question: “We should not distrust or have a bad opinion of anybody; we should not look at his words and actions exposing his disbelief, but those indicating his îmân. Îmân exists in the heart. Allah knows if there is îmân in a heart. No one else knows it. He who says ‘disbeliever’ about a person with îmân in his heart becomes a disbeliever himself. We should regard everybody as a Muslim and love anybody who does not openly speak ill of Islam,” is said. Is this point of view correct?

Answer: It is wrong to say we shouldn’t distrust anybody. Its correct form is “We shouldn’t distrust a Muslim.” In other words, when a person who says that he is a Muslim and does not express a word or does not do an action rendering him a disbeliever, says or does something which may mean belief as well as disbelief, we should understand it as belief, and we should not say that he has gone out of Islam.But when a person strives to demolish Islam and to make youngsters disbelievers, or if he says “good” about one of the harâms, tries to make it popular so that everybody will commit it, or if he says that one of Allâhu ta’âlâ’s commandments is retrogressive and harmful, he is called a disbeliever. Even if he says that he is a Muslim, performs namâz (ritual prayer) and goes on a hajj (pilgrimage), he is still called a zindiq. It would be stupidity to regard such hypocritical people, who deceive Muslims, as Muslims.]

 

[1] Please see the first chapter of the fifth fascicle of Endless Bliss for terms such as ‘dhimmî’, ‘harbî’, ‘zakât’, ‘jizya’, and the like.

Source: Endless Bliss (Se’âdet-i Ebediyye) by Hüseyn Hilmi Işık, Nineteenth Edition, Hakikat Kitabevi, 20014