Moving To Turkey

Moving To Turkey

 

 

Those relocating to Turkey find wonderful combination of ancient and the modern where Asia (“the East”) and Europe (“the West) meet in legendary city Istanbul across the Bosphorus. In addition, Turkey offers chance to experience a unique country with a rich heritage that dates back to antiquity.

Turkey is a popular and attractive destination that rewards those making the move with an enriching and surprising experience.

Turkey has a population of nearly 80 million people, a secular constitution where beliefs and and worldviews are respected and everyone is welcomed to practise their own religion.

Turkey’s most popular city and the centre where most expats are based is Istanbul, although there is much more to the country than just one city.

Turkey has a wide range of landscapes, sights and characters that will readily appeal to history, nightclub, archaeology, sun-beach, city-culture and shopping malls and so many divergent and various other options. There is no end to the fascination and excitement in Turkey

Those moving to Turkey should ensure they have all the relevant paperwork in place. Many foreigners used to live in Turkey by making “visa runs” by leaving and re-entering Turkey every 90 days to extend their tourist visa for a further three months. This is no longer accepted and authorities are clamping down on the practice. Visitors are now only able to stay in Turkey for a total of 90 days in any period of 180 days and visas need to be applied for before entering the country. Those wishing to reside in Turkey long-term need to obtain a relevant work or residence permit.

The cost of living in Turkey is more reasonable than in neighbouring European countries. It has yet to be admitted into the EU, but the country has already gone so far in applying EU standards in nearly all dimensions of the life.   Those coming from a country with strong purchasing power can make their money last longer and reach further, even if choosing to live in the largely popular areas or in the coastal resort towns.

The country’s healthcare system is highly developed with a wide range of state and government hospitals and other healthcare institutions. According to official figures, Turkey is one of the most important destinations of health tourism, being preferred by patients from all over the world, especially Europe. So many good private healthcare facilities can be found in major cities and majority of doctors in these facilities will be able to speak English.

Turkey is a member of the UN and the NATO as well as an associate member of the European Union. Political reforms of the last 13 years have strengthened the democratic process and the Turkish economy and made the country an interesting option for many foreigners. The Turkish government is a republican parliamentary democracy. Turkish Republic is the successor state (continuation) of the Ottoman Empire.

Most people who move to Turkey relocate to bigger cities such as Istanbul, Ankara or Izmir. However, other cities have also been attracting a lot of foreigners as investors, employees and other purposes like tourism.

Most of the people moving to Turkey find work in the industry and services sectors. The latter in particular have become a highly important branch of Turkey’s national economy. Turkish economy provides a wealth of job opportunities, especially in import-export, banking, finance, and insurance for foreigners. Turkey is a rising power. The economy is booming in Turkey. Investment opportunities are simply enormous. Economy and political system is stable. So Turkey is a very important destination both for employment and investment.

In the last decade, the government has reduced much of its involvement in basic industries, banking as well as transport and communications and so many other sectors. So it is also possible to find work in one of the sectors which recently have gone through the changes of privatization.

The majority of the population in Turkey are Muslims who refuse to drink alcohol or eat pork. However, this might also apply to those who do not practice their religion. Upon moving to Turkey you might have to readjust a bit when inviting your Turkish friends over for dinner. Try to serve lamb, chicken or fish, until you know more about their individual beliefs and preferences.

Hospitality is an important aspect of the Turkish culture. Turkish people are highly sincere and affectionate. Some foreigners (especially Westerners) are shocked to find out the boundaries of personal space can easily be crossed. Especially those used to greater personal distance may need some time to adjust to this. It is in your hand to establish a balance between sincerity and personal space.

Shortly speaking, there is something for everyone in Turkey.